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  1.   0 points
    Ok, I had THIS with Goats milk. I froze it, then added the LYE...then when they mixed together, it was as if the Lye was trying to turn my Goats Milk into Soap, way before I added it to my oils. The goats milk lye solution turned kind of chunky, like it had turned into applesauce or ricotta cheese. I did Strain it in a fine strainer, but then I Dumped out my chunky stuff at the bottom. did I do that wrong? should I of dumped that chunky stuff into my warmed oils? oops, so , since I dumped out that chunky applesauce stuff, how will this affect the soap I just made today. ? Thanks so much.
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      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2015
      0 points
    Shelly - your goatsmilk curdled and tried to turn into cheese. You can still mix the whole thing with your oils, just stickblend really well. If you strain it like you did, you might lose some of the lye and your lye to oil ratios might be off.
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2015
      0 points
    Shelly - your goatsmilk curdled and tried to turn into cheese. You can still mix the whole thing with your oils, just stickblend really well. If you strain it like you did, you might lose some of the lye and your lye to oil ratios might be off.
  2.   1 point
    oh boy....then it is a good thing I only did a small 2 pound batch. Cause yes, I got rid of that chunky stuff...I originally figured the whole batch at 6% Super fat, a cold process soap. So, now since I got rid of that curdles stuff, ya...I guess it will be a surprise to me on Sunday when I unwrap the blankets and cut into it. Huh...very interesting indeed. Thanks for that information Christine :-)
    • CommentAuthorTaylor
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2015 edited
      0 points
    Shelly,

    I am not fond of making milk soaps where I freeze the milk or add the lye directly to the milk. I am too likely to have a batch that fails and that just drives me bonkers. (I can be a bit of a perfectionist.)

    I really like the Half and Half Method. It rarely fails (if ever) so long as you have the right temperatures. Chemistry professors have even determined it is the best way to make a milk soap that is smooth and beautiful without having the sugars overheat and take off like a herd of wild horses.

    Andee has written a great blog series about making soaps with milk. If you want to make another milk soap in the future, here are some things I consider key to making a successful milk soap.

    When making milk soaps, pour shallowly. It is better to use a large tray style mold than a deep log mold. We don't want the soap to build up too much heat or we can run into problems.

    Use room temperature milk. Don't use frozen milk, cold milk or even warm milk. We want room temperature milk. This helps because we are not trying to stall the reaction or add too much heat.

    I think you will love the half and half method because it makes temperamental milk soaps become a dream to work with. It can also lighten how dark your milk soaps get. An added bonus for you!

    Here are some blogs that show the Half and Half Method really well.

    http://blog.thesage.com/2010/02/08/cold-process-soap-half-and-half-method-with-cows-milk/

    http://blog.thesage.com/2010/02/10/cold-process-soap-half-and-half-method-with-goats-milk/

    http://blog.thesage.com/2010/02/11/cold-process-soap-half-and-half-method-with-buttermilk/

    I hope this helps answer your questions and makes it easier for you to have a beautiful bar.

    Edited to add...

    When making milk soaps, I would not insulate them. This keeps the excess heat in and is liable to make your soap run away like a team of wild horses. When it comes to milk, avoid the wild horses. ;-D
  3.   0 points
    Although I have never experienced any issues with pre-freezing my milk before using, I have found milk powders to be WAY more easier. I use the correct amount of liquid & at light trace I add the milk powder. I have buttermilk powder & I use 1Tbsp for every pound of oil with no ill effects. I have worked with whole milk, heavy cream, & buttermilk -liquid & powder....powder is easier since I never have to worry about scorching it. ;-)
  4.   1 point
    TAYLOR TAYLOR TAYLOR!!!! Thank You for your VERY hard work in posting this information for me.I mean that, I really do. I just went and read every article. And yes it does help :-)
    • CommentAuthorsoapbuddy
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2015
      0 points
    When I make milk soaps, I put them in the fridge or the freezer so the batch doesn't overheat. Using a stainless steel strainer, the chunks should be strainable into your oils. Just mash them through.
  5.   0 points
    Yeppers, even tho I have been making soap now for sometime, we ALWAYS Have something more to learn. And for me, Goats milk is a Learning Process. Glad to ave the advice from others here. Oh, and yes, thanks soapbuddy (Irena) for your advice as well :-)