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    • CommentAuthorcaren
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2011
      2 points
    Okay, you see by the title, I am looking for information. Some of you are probably giggling, some sites say to use between 20 and 25% pine tar for skin healing properties. I used 11% with my other oils of 76, OO, Palm, Castor. Those were the only oils I could find, I still have not unpacked my soap room after moving. After just 10 seconds of stick blending, I had instant chocolate pudding. 2 seconds later, I could have used an ice-cream scoop to get this stuff out of my soap pot, it might have worked great, balls of soap. Of course, I have had people inquire about old fashioned pine-tar soap so I made a 9 lb. batch, it looks like browned ground beef in my mold. I did wrap it in a blanket to see if it would cook to bring it together. I have never had anything so bad happen while making a batch, all I could do is laugh. My house reeks of pine tar, hopefully by morning, I'll either be used to it or the smell will have gone away.

    I'm thinking that even 11% is too much pine tar, someone give me a clue.......

    Caren
    • CommentAuthorCece
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2011
      2 points
    Hi Caren
    I made a copy of a pine tar soap that was posted by Southern Soapers before Kelly closed. Her comments are interesting regarding why she quit making pine tar soap to sell "(FDA says that a product is a drug if the lay or scientific community perceive it as such and purchase it with that intention)." Something to think about. Since she no longer made the soap she gives her recipe.

    32.4 oz lard
    43.1 oz soybean
    10.8 oz coconut (76 degree)
    10 oz pne tar (sap value is .043)
    1 oz russian fir essential oil
    2 oz lavender essential oil
    lye at 6% discount is 11.1 oz lye
    water (do NOT discount) is 30 oz

    Mix lye into water and set aside to cool. Cool further in refrigerator. MUST be COLD - about 56-65 degrees. Oils must be 65-75 degrees and will be sloppy and sloshy with some thickening. Add essential oils to water before adding to oil as lavender will slow down the fast trace of pine tar soap.

    MUST be lavender EO and not lavender FO by the way to regress trace.

    Hope this helps.

    You can read the entire post if you type in pine tar soap from southern soapers and look for that blog entry that pops up.
    • CommentAuthorcaren
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2011
      1 point
    Thanks Cece, before I went to bed last night, I was able to push it into the mold with a spoon, I had to throw my spatula away because I broke it trying to get the soap out of the pot. This morning, it looks beautiful, just a little crumbly on top, after it cools down, I will unmold it. I read online afterwards at "about.com" that it will trace real real fast and you don't need a stick blender, a spoon will do. Next time I make it, if I do, I will check out the lavender trick. I don't make any claims about any of my soaps, just alot of people wanted to try old time pine-tar soap that they heard about from their grandparents. Thanks,

    Caren
    •  
      CommentAuthorc2bb54
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2011
      1 point
    I also make Pine Tar soap, but I am extremely careful not to put on the label any "healing properties" as that changes the staus from soap to something the FDA can regulate...don't even want to go there. Pine Tar (and Coal Tar) both cause very rapid acceleration. When I make my pine tar soap, I have the temps of the lye around 45 degrees, and I add it slowly, whip it, add some more, whip it etc. My pine tar soap turns out beautiful and smooth and comes out of the molds very easily. Linda from Upland Soap Factory was the one who tutored me on how to make beautiful pine tar soap and she was definitely right. It takes a bit more effort, but well worth it. Cindy
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2011
      1 point
    i made pine tar soap once several years ago. i left it unscented. i figured the pungent scent of the pine tar itself would always come through, no matter what fragrance you used. i'm surprised to read how pine tar your recipes actually used. all i did was use about a 1/2 cup per 6 lb batch of oils and i did not calculate it into my fats. i did cool down my oils and lye a lot and it traced very quickly, but it was pourable and manageable. the soap itself was very strong smelling and did help clear up the psoriasis on my head. i did not sell it with any claims. simply called it pine tar soap. i don't know why i haven't made any since, i guess i just haven't gotten around to it.

    so i guess my question is . . . is the large quantity of that stucky stuff really necessary?
    •  
      CommentAuthorEsther
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2011 edited
      5 points
    Off the subject, but I grew up with pine trees in our woods that were 'tapped' for tar.....I remember barrels of that stuff and once, my brother tipped it over on himself--head to toe super sticky and he was a pine straw magnet. It took turpentine and I think finally kerosene to get it off of him.

    I don't think you could pay me enough to make soap with it.....lard yes, but pine tar? I still get shivers just thinking about it.
    • CommentAuthorcaren
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2011
      2 points
    Thanks everyone for your input, I will keep all this information in mind if I should ever try this one again. After unmolding the soap, I decided to rebatch to make it smoother, I'll keep you all posted.

    Thanks,

    Caren
    • CommentAuthorCece
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2011
      1 point
    Probably a stupid question but is pine tar the same as pine gum? Pine Gum is clear and dries to a brittle yellow. It was used by the American Indians to bring boils to a head, draw infection etc. and I can tell you that it does really work. We gather it every year in the pines when camping when we can find a tree with fresh sap running. I'm thinking it is not the same as the pine tar I've seen that is dark.
    • CommentAuthorcaren
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2011
      1 point
    Cece,

    I have read that pine tar has been cooked, not quiet sure how they do it or for how long. I can tell you that it is sticky, smelly and very dark, bought my can from the local farm co-op. Still learning the area I just moved to, and where I can buy certain things locally.

    Caren
    • CommentAuthorHannahobs
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2014
      1 point
    I have a recipe for PT soap that is :
    13.5 oz lard, 13.5 olive, 8.2 palm k, 5.8 sunflower, 7.2 pine tar, 5.9 lye, 15.8 water ( from about.com).

    I have some very old sunflower oil so I'm not sure if I should,use it.
    What can I replace it with??
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2014
      1 point
    Has the sunflower oil turned rancid or does it still smell good?
    • CommentAuthorHannahobs
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2014
      1 point
    No bad smell. It was totally sealed and had never been opened. It seems ok.
    You think I can use it?

    And does that recipe seem ok? I've looked around the Internet for info on this and recipes. They don't seem to be consistent, or similar. This one seems ok tho and lots of instructions for making it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2014
      2 points
    Go ahead and use the Sunflower in soap! I would make soap with it, but not necessarily lotions or creams because we are dealing with a shorter shelf life.

    Pine Tar is an excellent recipe accelerator. I worry that this will be too much Pine Tar and make instant concrete.

    We recommend following the 6-5-4-1 idea that Taylor recently discussed on the blog in the Introduction to Soapmaking series. I would then add 0.1 oz of Pine Tar per pound of fats used. It would be treated like an additive instead of a large amount of mostly unsaponifiable matter in your soap. I've run two calculations and given you links to the PDF files here. I think you will be happier with the MMS version and find it much less complicated.

    http://blog.thesage.com/wp-content/uploads/PineTarAbout.comVersion.pdf

    http://blog.thesage.com/wp-content/uploads/PineTarMMSVersion.pdf
    • CommentAuthorHannahobs
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2014
      1 point
    Thank you! I am carefully checking them out.

    But, from what I read you really need about 15% pt to make a difference in the soap. Too much?
  1.   0 points
    Hi Andee, I now have a can of Pine Tar...my husband has a super flaky scalp! So we are ready to make pine tar soap.
    We plan to make a Shampoo Bar or Liquid Shampoo...this is so exciting to of found Pine Tar in our town!! I will post back how it turned out after its made. I am NOT a Pine Tar expert and this will be our first time using it. Fun Fun Fun, we LOVE Adventures!!!
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2015
      0 points
    Let us know how it works out!
  2.   1 point
    Sure thing Andee...Will post back what we end up doing. I think this might end up being our weekend Date together!! Have a glass of wine, share some stories of our life, talk about our grandchildren and make Soap together sneaking in a kiss and hug along the way. Yes, we weird, Soaping is one of the DATES we enjoy together..he he
    • CommentAuthortjcav2363
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2015
      0 points
    I've made many batches of pine tar soap over the last couple of years. After trial and error I have concocted great recipe. Only once did I get the dreaded volcano effect. Yikes hot lye all over the counter and floor. It was my first batch but a good learning lesson on how pine tar reacts with lye! Anyway I sell this soap in my shop and it's my number 1 best selling soap by far. I don't add any essential oils for fragrance but I do add Tea Tree Oil for the healing benefits and I also add colloidal oatmeal in my recipe. I can't keep my soap in stock it sells out really fast. I actually had one customer buy 2 dozen bars to send to their family. I never call it medicinal soap but I do tell my customers the natural benefits of the soap and why people like to use it but I always stress that I am not a Doctor and I do not diagnose nor recommend my soap as a medical treatment. I just tell them the testimonials that my customers have given me regarding how much my soap helps for their dry skin and psoriasis, etc.
  3.   0 points
    Hi Andee you asked me to write back how it all turned out for me. Well, short story is that I used 20% pina tar in my recipe, and at the end of the day the soap was NOT usable. 20% seemed to be WAY TO MUCH and the house stunk so so so bad. Also, the soap itself had a weird ink like feel to it and grainy feeling, like car oil, like when you get an oil change. I do not know, but we tried to use it several times only to regret it each time. We will try making it again sometime, butt for SURE not at 20%. For the most part, it felt as if the soap did NOT saponify, and I do not know how to describe it, but, it just felt weird.

    I am glad it worked out for your Tjcav2363..Thats GREAT!! I DO Want it to work out for me too......We made a Liquid Soap, not a bar soap
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeNov 4th 2015
      2 points
    I've made pine tar soap. Once. And now I never ever have to do that again. Curiosity satisfied! I used (I think) 20% pine tar, no stick blender, and cool oils and lye. It still accelerated trace to a crazy point. I expected that, so I poured it quickly and didn't have to scrape too much, but wow! That moves fast! I think no one ever will steal my pine tar soap. It stank so strongly that I put it in a cardboard box to cure and I haven't opened except to sell one bar. It's not a huge seller for me. Not at all. So, now my stash is aging nicely, and it doesn't stink so much, but it's been months and months and months. It's still in the cardboard box. I don't advertise any healing properties, just that I have it available to anyone who wants to smell like a campfire. Ha!
    • CommentAuthorHannahobs
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2015 edited
      1 point
    I followed the recipe at about.com and I haven't had any problems. It doesn't stink up the house either. I have even used it at almost 20%. Its a great seller.
  4.   0 points
    wow, does NOT stink up the house for you Hannahobs? amazing!! That has got to be a keeper of a recipe then
  5.   0 points
    I have only made the LIQUID SOAP using pine tar....and ya, still not right just yet...must keep tweaking