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  1.   2 points
    We are having high humidity here in the Great state of Colorado this summer. I know some of you are thinking what? But for us it is high humidity. Anywho, since I have been trying to make bath bombs this summer, following the same recipe I have been using forever... and they are "fluffy" that is my best description.... Any thoughts.....
    2 c Baking Soda
    1 c citric acid
    .6 oz oil mixture, which I do not have my exact recipe right now... sweet almond and cocoa butter, with a touch of Poly 20
    .2 oz EO or FO.....

    Fluffy! I have no idea how to fix this problem because they have always turned out fine.....
    •  
      CommentAuthorEsther
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2011
      0 points
    Are they fluffy from the get go or do they get fluffy after sitting out a bit?
    • CommentAuthorCece
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2011
      0 points
    I am laughing because we've been 'humid' here in Idaho - or at least so much more than usual that I've been complaining. I know. . . .nothing like everywhere it is REALLY humid! I'll be interested in what you do to correct this problem.
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2011
      5 points
    "bake" them in the oven on low heat, like 170 degrees F with the oven door open, for a couple of hours and then immediately shrink wrap. that's how we deal with them in places where there is actually HIGH humidity, like 100% sometimes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorEsther
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2011
      1 point
    What Chrima said. It's very humid here at times (like in the 80's) but I've never had trouble with the oven then wrap method.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2011
      0 points
    If you bake them, does the fragrance go away?
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2011
      0 points
    not if you use low heat and keep the door open for air flow. if they dry quickly that way, you kinda seal the fragrance in, especially if you wrap immediately after.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2011
      0 points
    Thanks chrima! My oven goes down to 170 degrees F, is that low enough?
  2.   1 point
    I have baked them before, but it leaves the fragrance in my oven.....perhaps I will try with the door open...
  3.   0 points
    The fluffiness is the next day almost...... Canning all weekend, so I did not make any bath product this weekend. ANd today, well it has rained all morning. Betting that I do not even attempt bath bombs when I get home. Soon though I will be trying them again.
  4.   0 points
    I try to make bath bomb for the first time today. I am not sure if I have the same problem as Crystal or not, but mine became "fluffy", almost effervescent, after only 10-15 min. Here's the recipe I try (in weight):
    - 1 part citric acid
    - 1 part corn starch
    - 1 part sea salt
    - 2 part backing soda
    - a few drops of grape seed oil and grape fragrance
    - colored water (using food coloring) in a spray as needed for the mixture to clump.

    I mixed it all together with my 3 years old son adding the blue color water in the spray bottle (he loved that part!). Once it started clumping in my fist, we filled fish shaped rubber ice cube tray and left it on the counter for a few minutes. Next time I looked the mixture was overflowing the mold and it was very mushy. It was humid today, but not overly so. Could the humidity be to blame for the result or is it my recipe or my method? I need the advice of a bomb expert here...

    As I had read this post before, I quickly unmolded the bath bomb fishy, put them on a tray in the oven (I did not remember how much to cook them, so I warmed up the oven at 200F then turn it off and put the bath bombs in it with close door for about 1 hr). The mixture is now hard and dry, but it look like a bad batch of blueish meringue cookies all clump together. I will be curious to see how they work in the bath tub...

    Julie ^_^
    •  
      CommentAuthorEsther
    • CommentTimeSep 30th 2011 edited
      1 point
    Don't use water-- use alcohol and only sparingly. What makes bath bombs fizz is the chemical reaction between an acid (citric acid) and alkaline (Baking Soda). What triggers that action and fizz is water. To get the bombs to bind together, you have to use oil based products, polysorbate, alcohol etc. It took me a while to work the kinks out of mine, but now, I can get them to bind with just a few spritzes of alcohol misted over the batch.

    Just my opinion, but I also think you have way too much salt for any binding to take place without the mixture being 'wet'. Try leaving it out all together and reducing the cornstarch by 50% or making it 25% of the baking soda portion.
  5.   0 points
    Thanks Esther for the additional information.
    I remade the recipe today (before I saw your suggestion about reducing salt and corn starch) using only rubbing alcohol for binding. This seem to work way better! The bombs are only 2 hours old, but they are dry (I used the oven) and hard for the moment. I will see how they hold until tomorrow. I will try again with your additional suggestion next time.

    Julie ^_^
  6.   2 points
    Julie I agree with Esther. The general base for bath bombs tends to be 2 parts baking soda to 1 part citric acid. I started with a base of 2 cups baking soda, 1 cup citric acid, at this point I could add up to 2 or 3 T. of salt, yogurt or any powdered addition. Remember that your essential or Fragrance oil that is added is part of the liquid used to bind the bath bombs. I had forgotten that last part for a while, it makes a difference when too much liquid is added. I measure out no more than .8 oz of my binding mixture ( I use a combination of oils, polysorbate and cocoa butter) & fragrance. Mix thouroughly and then spritz 3 times with rubbing alcohol.

    Good Luck,

    Crystal
  7.   0 points
    Thanks Crystal for your suggestions. It was a recipe I had found on the web that suggested using so much salt. Since I had never made bath bomb before I did not know better. Although my second batch seem to have worked. They are still hard, did not really morph from their original shape, smell good and my son liked they way they fuzz in water. I just ordered some more citric acid and next time I will use yours and heather's recipe and see how it goes. I haven't tried one myself yet, but they are so fun to make that I can't wait to try some more.
    Now I just have to convince my son that he cannot eat them!

    Thanks again for the help. I will try to post some pictures when I get better in making them.

    Julie ^_^
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
      2 points
    What a night! Feeling a little frustrated right now :(
    I was feeling quite proud of myself having mastered my first batch of bath bombs for the swap so I decided a second batch was in order. About halfway through mixing up batch #2 I look over and see the beautiful results of batch #1 starting to look kinda droopy and slightly fizzy in places. Remembering someone in the forum said they dry theirs in the oven I turned it on to 200* and popped them in to dry. Figuring this would take quite some time I merrily went back to working on batch 2.
    One fatal extra squirt or so of the witch hazel and batch 2 was not going so well. It was looking like it's not going to be completed tonight since it was too sticky and not wanting to come unmolded. At least I think that is what it was. I then decide to peak at bath #1 to make myself feel better about this little failure. Boy did I ever get a disappointment! Batch #1 no longer looks like merry little orange balls of wonderfulness but like a whole cookie sheet of failed cookies!!!! $3 worth of overpriced citric acid from Walmart wasted- They Melted :(
    I am thinking now Batch #2 may just become packets of bath fizzy.
    Flounces off to bed to a box of chocolate chip cookies.....
    •  
      CommentAuthorc2bb54
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
      0 points
    Bath bombs can certainly be very picky. Getting the right mix can be an art. It has taken me lots of experimentation to get my own recipe that I love just so. I do have water in mine, but I make an emulsion with very little water to my oil mixture and add that a little at a time and it makes a very beautiful and decadent bath bomb that is so soft and bubbly. Don't worry, just chock up your efforts as learning experiences. Cindy
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
      0 points
    i'm the one that dries them in the oven. however, i add the liquid to start with VERY CAREFULLY. most times i use witch hazel and i use a fine mister bottle. i mist and mix and mist and mix and when the stuff just somehow sticks together enough to make bombs, i stop. when i put them in the oven, i leave the door open and check every 10 minutes or so and will turn them around if one side is crusty.

    don't feel bad though, mesha - a bunch of years ago, i was traveling to a craft show with 50 some freshly made orange vanilla bombs in the back of my car all neatly arranged in a little basket. i was running a little late so i was stepping on it, until i hit the railroad tracks and took on a little air. apparently the basket in the back of the car took on air as well, and when it landed, my 50 some beautifully shaped bathbombs were nothing but a crumbly mess. there was not a single one that stayed whole. (did i mention i took on A LOT of air?) the upside is that my car smelled delicious for months, but that didn't save all the work i did and all the materials i had to divert to personal use and start over.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
      0 points
    I know your pain Mesha! I think to get good at making bath bombs, you just have to make them regularly. Like chrima said, getting the right amount of moisture in them to make them stick but not start the reaction is an art form in itself. Are you able to chip your melted bombs apart and make them into chunky bath fizzies? You could put them in a nice cello bag and promote the chunkiness. :-)

    I use distilled water to make my bath bombs. I don't like the smell of the alcohol that most witch hazel is made with, so I just don't use it. Ever. I use a fine-spray mister and mist it gradually as I'm working it, that way I'm always checking to see if it is "there" yet.

    That said, I'm making bath bombs today ~ I've been putting this off for a couple of weeks! LOL! Wish me luck!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2012 edited
      0 points
    I think part of the issue is that I just don't know what to much or to little moisture looks like and feels like. That's not something you can pick up from a video or pics. I think I may try with some ice cube trays or something 1st rather then the melon baller looking thing I bought. Maybe I can go to conference sometime and they will have a class on it and I can get that hands on :)
    Don't worry I will win!
    For now it is going to get back burnerer though since I have many other things that are more pressing. I just thought bath bombs for the swap would be nice since Emily is making some really cool stuff!
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2012
      3 points
    ha ha, gotta out-do the other soap maker!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2012
      0 points
    Well of course :)
    You guys don't make the challenge easy either-lol
  8.   1 point
    Mostly I'm just trying not to embarrass myself!
    •  
      CommentAuthorLori
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2012
      0 points
    Oh, Mesha, I feel your pain. I had that exact problem last week. My SIL had made a special request for bath bombs for her wedding gift from me. To say the least, they weren't as pretty as they were supposed to be. :(
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2012
      2 points
    Susan you have yet to embarrass yourself. Often your items are among my favorites.

    Lori I think we are harder on ourselves then what others are. I bet they looked great :)
  9.   0 points
    Seems like a great place to discuss Bath Bomb Colorants........

    What does everyone use?

    What does MMS recommend for colors?
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeMay 3rd 2014
      0 points
    I used to color my bath bombs with pigments. They came out looking great. However, if you do add any oil to your recipe, it will leave a colored ring around the tub. This was pointed out to me by a customer and I have since not colored them at all.
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2014
      0 points
    We generally use water soluble dyes. We use dye colored water to dampen the mixture and then press the bombs into our desired shapes. These colors would be Lemon Yellow, Grape, Purple Raspberry, and Ocean Blue. This blog post shows how we usually do it. http://blog.thesage.com/2009/04/01/bath-fizzy-hearts/

    I hope this helps!
  10.   0 points
    Thanks Andee, I have had those dyes before.

    Christine, that is my fear.... I am working on a new bath bomb "pack" and they will be visible through a window in the box. They look so boring. Normally, mine are all White for that exact reason, and my regular bombs are just wrapped in paper.
    • CommentAuthorTaylor
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2014
      0 points
    We have never had problems with the water soluble colors causing rings in our tubs. Keep in mind that our recipe does not include any oils. (Oils contribute to that tub ring.) We have found recipes that include oils are more likely to bubble and form warts because the water isn't distributed evenly.
  11.   0 points
    Yup, I have oils.... Perhaps I will revisit the idea of coloring some bath salts and adding those to the top of the flowers before pressing. Not looking for fancy, just a little pop. Back to the drawing board.
    • CommentAuthorTaylor
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2014
      0 points
    Try it with the dyes and see. Since you already have oils, your customers will have to deal with a ring but it shouldn't be colored if you use a dye.

    I hope this helps.
    • CommentAuthorelaine
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2017
      0 points
    Looking for help with bath bomb recipes. Mine don't seem to last as long as the store bought ones
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2017
      0 points
    Elaine,

    What is your goal for your ideal bath bomb? Let's see if we can come up with something for you!