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  1.   0 points
    Hi There,

    I'm making bath salts for a Holiday Sale next week and am thinking about using Red, Rose and/or Green clays for coloring parts of the salts in the tubes. I used clay as colorant for body scrubs before and it works nicely, but was wondering if anyone has used it in bath salts? Would it just float on top of the water, or would it dissolve with the salts? I don't want to leave a colored ring around the bathtub or the person if you know what I mean!

    Thanks,

    Kathy
    •  
      CommentAuthorEsther
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2011
      3 points
    :::Raising and waving hand wildly:::

    I did it! I added red clay to my bath salts as well as some conditioning oil and I got...
    the biggest azz, reddest ring around the tub you have ever seen.

    And I gave it as gifts in a swap too! (hangs head in shame).... I almost sent everyone a bottle of bleach spray in the next swap for clean up.
  2.   0 points
    Thanks Esther for sharing your "experiences"!!!! Come to think of it, I may have gotten one of those swap gifts at Valentine's Day? Anyway, no clay in my baths salts for sure! Back to the drawing board.

    Kathy
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2011
      0 points
    Esther! LOL!! I love your stories!!
  3.   0 points
    I have started to make a few bath salt and bath milk lately too. I have used food coloring with great success. Does not take much and so far it did not color my bath tub.

    Good luck Kathy!

    PS: Thanks Esther for sharing your experience. Clay was on my list of thing to try.
  4.   0 points
    Thanks Julie,

    I'm trying not to use synthetic colors, so no Food Coloring or water soluble dyes. That's why I was thinking clays. In the past I've left the bath salts naturally white, but just looking for a nice color for the holidays.

    Kathy
  5.   0 points
    Here's an idea. Why don't you use botanical like mint for green and rose petal for pink/red in your salts? You may want to provide large tea bag for when people use them in the bath tub so that the botanicals don't go down the drain. I think it would make some lovely looking salt jars!

    Julie ^_^
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      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2011
      0 points
    julie's idea is great with the botanicals. i've tried oxides in bath salts and bath bombs, and the result is the same. ring in the tub. you could try micas, but you'd probably have to go very lightly on them.

    of course there's always the option of using a salt that already has a color. the coarse pink himalayan salt looks lovely just by itself!
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      CommentAuthorSimona
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2011
      0 points
    maybe orange from sea buckthorn oil, buriti oil or even red palm oil ? perhaps only a few drops of warm oil will gently colour the salts , without staining the bathtub....


    I have never tried micas in salts... but they could be nice and I guess they do not stain.... but then again, I just GUESS :)
  6.   1 point
    Thanks Everyone!

    I like the botanicals idea, am also thinking to try spritzing with a long steeped cinnamon, clove or plum tea - just enough to color the salts but not enough to dissolve them. I'll try on a tiny bit and let you know how it works. It seems it's always harder to create with natural ingredients when it comes to scents and colors, but then again do I really need colored bath salts?

    Kathy
  7.   0 points
    Maybe along the line of Julie's thoughts, in a coffee grinder, powder hibicus petals, calendula, red sandalwood, annatto, etc. Maybe it wouldn't leave too much left in the tub? Love to hear what you come up with.
  8.   0 points
    Just a note on red palm oil. I have used it in soap with great success, it makes a lovely orange bar. The lather is orange, but does not stain (at 20% anyway). The raw oil however, leave a very thick orange on anything it touches. You can wash soap making tool easy enough, but I would NOT recommend it to soak in the bath tub.

    Julie ^_^
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      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2011
      0 points
    I have been wondering about the botanicals I add to my bath salts- they keep turning brown and loosing their beauty. Does adding oil to the bath salt prevent this? What am I doing wrong?
    •  
      CommentAuthorchrima
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2011
      0 points
    i've been wondering about drying botanicals. i noticed that some people manage to dry things and they retain their color so beautifully. so last weekend i asked a lady and she says she uses silica gel, the stuff that florists use to dry flowers. so i'm thinking maybe if they are dried in such a way that they retain their color in the first place, the end product won't turn so brown?
  9.   0 points
    I have used beautiful purple lavender in bath salts and they stay, but no oils within that batch. Then I used some peppermint in a bath salt with a touch of oil, within weeks, it was brown.

    Crystal
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2011
      1 point
    Mine are turning brown even in the salts I have made up that don't yet have any fragrance in them. I like to take some of them unscented and add the oils onsite at the show so I can allow customers to pick scents to match their soap with out having to stock 20 different kinds. Only takes a second to fix them up and customers seem to like the versatility. I do also have some pre-made ones of best sellers and certain EO blends
    •  
      CommentAuthorLori
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2011
      0 points
    I have used beet root powder in bath bombs with decent (pinkish) results. However, there's not much noticeable color until moisture touches it (the beet color is water soluble) so it gets specklie pink when I spritz it, and then dissolves and turns the water pale pinkish when added to the tub. For me it seems to be oils and/or other additives in the recipe that promote the bathtub ring/residue, but I'm not sure - that and super hard water.

    hope that makes sense.
    ~Lori
  10.   0 points
    Revisiting the coloring of bath salts, without the use of food coloring. I would like to essentially color my salts before adding them to my soaps. Any thoughts?

    Crystal
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2014
      0 points
    Is this for salt soaps?
  11.   0 points
    Oops, no, for my bath Bombs Andee.
    • CommentAuthoritsy
    • CommentTimeFeb 15th 2014
      0 points
    Newbie here, so feel free to discount my comments with an indulgent shake of the head...

    I recently made my first bath bombs (and bath crayons) for the kiddies. I used powdered candy color from Linnea's Inc. because if they are safe enough to eat, they are ok to bathe in. :)
  12.   0 points
    Itsy,

    I am doing my best to avoid pigments. Probably not going to happen, but doing my best just the same.
    • CommentAuthoritsy
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2014
      0 points
    I'm sure you will figure it out. :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2014
      0 points
    The only thing that is coming to mind is creating strong herbal tinctures (water infusions) and using that to color the salts. Like Alkanet, Annatto, Safflower, Paprika, or even red cabbage water. ;) As these would be treated as water based plant dyes, there is lots of potential. Taylor says you might even want to try Kelp or Spirulina.
  13.   0 points
    I like that idea Andee. I was thinking of infusing oil, but that does not evaporate off. I shall make some teas on Wednesday and give it a go. :) Did we not decide that Red Cabbage water leaves a nasty smell behind?
    •  
      CommentAuthorandee
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2014
      0 points
    Well... In CP yes. But we won't be changing the pH with bath salts. I like eating cabbage but I haven't for the last two years, so I can't remember if cabbage is stinky or not. I think it would be an interesting experiment. I think since we would be dealing with water evaporating, any smell might be negligible, but I don't know for sure.
  14.   1 point
    I do not have red cabbage, therefore, it will not be part of the experiment. I do however have oodles and oodles of jars of tomatoes.