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    • CommentAuthorMaryah
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2012
      5 points
    a couple of days i was looking thue another forum and as i read it i got the feeling that they really did not want anyone else to even try. it was just really bad experance. and i wanted to say thank you for being so welcoming and warm not judgemental. it took my husband forever to let me try and i have been doing the resurch for many years. again thank you for your help and feed back.
    maryah
  1.   6 points
    You're welcome here. Everyone was new to something when they started.
    Whether that's learning how to drive or how to make cosmetics and soaps.
    And remember, if you don't know the answer, there really are no dumb questions.
    Some weird questions, maybe, but we're all searching for an answer to something.
    Hope you get as much joy out of the journey as you do the end products.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeOct 4th 2012
      4 points
    So did you make soap yet? We want pics :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2012
      1 point
    Maryah, I feel the same way - there are a lot of forums and groups out there, but this one is the most comfortable for me. I hope you'll get a chance to try some of the swaps - they are way fun and a really good opportunity to share and learn and get to know the other soapers and lotion-makers here.
    • CommentAuthorMaryah
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2012
      1 point
    yes i have made 2 batches the pictures are on our camera. i have not transfered the pictures yet. the first batch was tanned by the char in the cast iron pot, and the second, is a preitty white. i will see if i can transfer them when i get my pc back (it is in the shop getting fixed). i wish we had the money to get more ingredants for soap but alas i have to be paticent time will tell what i get to do. i just am soo greatful for the support and i don't think i will look at other forums for a while. :)
    maryah
  2.   0 points
    You made soap in a cast iron pot? hmmm.

    Glad you made your first batches, and I love this forum, many helpful and inspiring peeps on here.

    You will find ways around supplies, spices in your cupboards for colorants, added to a simple Olive and coconut oil soap, you will be hooked on finding those "local" sourced ingredients just to keep the soaping fires burning. Good luck.

    Crystal
    • CommentAuthorCece
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2012
      0 points
    Welcome to this incredible world of soap making and other fine body care items! I am also intrigued by you using a cast iron pot to make soap. I do hope you aren't going to cook in it later? I know that if I dye threads in a cast iron pot, especially natural dyes, the iron from the pot changes the color. Not sure what iron will do to the saponification process? Personally I stick to stainless steel pots that I've designated for soap making, and I see others using plastic containers all the time. I don't combine my lye and water in glass containers in case the heat would break the glass, and I use plastic for that. Would be interesting to learn more about the soap you made in the iron pot. Have you checked it for PH?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMesha
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2012 edited
      1 point
    You will know you really have the bug when everyday object begin to be judged on their potential usefulness as a soap mold.
    I recently made a soap that was pretty dang good that could easily be adapted to grocery store oils. Here is an adaption of it.

    Soybean Oil 10% 1.6oz
    Coconut Oil, 76 deg 25% 4oz
    Crisco, new w/palm 30% 4.8oz
    Sunflower Oil 15% 2.4oz
    Olive Oil 20% 3.2oz
    Water 0.38% 6.08 oz - only use 4oz and replace 2 oz with coconut milk. Don't add any lye to the milk though. Put the milk in the oils before you add
    the lye water
    Lye - NaOH 2.25 oz or 63.784 g- I prefer to measure my lye in grams.
    This will be really soft at 1st so will probably need to stay in the mold a few days.
    I often find cans of coconut milk at the dollar stores. Sometimes they don't have as much fat in them as what I get at the regular store but that is a good thing bcse I don't have to worry about having a soap that is too superfatted.
    • CommentAuthorBonnie
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2012
      0 points
    Marya, congrats on your first two batches of soap! Can't wait for the pics!
    • CommentAuthorMaryah
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2012 edited
      0 points
    umm how do i upload pics?? i've never done that before......

    as for the ph i don't have strips so we set it asside for a minimum of 4 weeks, so as not to tempt fate. i am not fond of the tounge test and won't even touch battery that way. but i have found that the first batch cleaned off grease that had built up over time in my in-laws kitchen. not that they didn't clean, the comerical stuff just did not work at all, not even dawn or ajax. i love those brands but they didn't work.
    Maryah
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2012
      0 points
    Maryah, this might help. I've just used links to facebook to show off. :)

    http://forum.thesage.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=503
  3.   0 points
    Maryah; Congrats on your first batches! I'm not fond of the tongue test either. I want to use the soap, not taste it. I try a new batch by just washing my hands. If they burn due to excess lye...well, I keep a bottle of vinegar nearby. The vinegar will neutralize any lye/burn. I also keep a bottle on the counter when making soap in the event I get splashed. To me, it's cheap insurance. ;-)

    Cece; Making the lye/water solution in plastic seems interesting. I've always used a canning jar and keep the solution in the sink. If the jar cracks due to heat, it automatically goes down the drain. But, the jar gets pretty darn hot, doesn't have a handle, and I do get concerned about it slipping out of the "hot pad enclosed" hands. What type of plastic do you use? Anything special or just anything from the dollar store?

    Thanks!
    •  
      CommentAuthorAnaBanana
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2012
      1 point
    Becky, you can use just really cheap plastic measuring cups - they have a handle to make it easier to work with. Lye does not react with plastic, so you're pretty good there. You might try to avoid the more brittle plastics like the clear ones... the heat can crack that stuff anyhow.

    Rinsing with water is a faster, less painful way to avoid a lye burn - the vinegar is acidic and will neutralize the strong base some, but it's a weak acid and burns in the burn, so the best strategy is to not get burned, but if you do, flush with lots and lots of cool water first.
    •  
      CommentAuthorLori
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2012
      1 point
    I always make sure my lye-mixing container can hold boiling water without warping, cracking, or getting soft. Usually if its dishwasher safe, you're good in that regard. Some materials can handle the heat OK, but may crack with sudden temperature changes. I've never had that happen and don't know how likely it is, but when I add the lye to my chilled liquid it gets hot in a hurry.
    I also greatly prefer something with a handle for safety sake. Just my two bits. :) Mixing in the sink is a great idea.
  4.   2 points
    I have to give a huge I AGREE! This is the best forum ever.

    The lovely people here are always helpful and never judgmental. They always provide an alternative with their criticism and never belittle people.

    On another note, you can make fantastic soap with just grocery store purchases. Use the mms lye calc and go for it!